UPDATE: Mariners planning to offer nine years, $225 million to Robinson Cano

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UPDATE: The Mariners may not have offered $200 million to Robinson Cano yet, but it sounds like it’s going to happen before long.

David Waldstein of the New York Times and CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman are both reporting that the Mariners plan to offer nine years and $225 million to Cano. This is a slightly different number than what was reported by Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes earlier this afternoon, but it’s still likely higher than where the Yankees are willing to go.

Nine years and $225 million would give Cano an AAV (average annual value) of $25 million, tying him with Ryan Howard, Josh Hamilton, and Felix Hernandez for the fifth-highest in MLB history.

6:36 p.m. ET: Don’t rule out Robinson Cano’s return to the Yankees just yet.

Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes made some waves earlier this afternoon when he reported that Robinson Cano was on a plane to Seattle and that the Mariners were willing to bid $230-240 million over 10 years in order to sign him. However, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal hears that no such offer has been made. At least not yet.

In other words, Cano is aiming to land the same contract that Albert Pujols received from the Angels (10 years, $240 million) two offseasons ago. Only two deals in MLB history have been richer, both of them for Alex Rodriguez, first with the Rangers in December of 2000 ($252 million) and later with the Yankees in December of 2007 ($275 million). The Mariners are obviously interested in making a big splash this winter, but they’ll likely have to blow the Yankees out of the water to have a chance. $240 million would probably do just that, but we’re not sure it’s actually on the table.

Pitch clock cut minor league games by 25 minutes to 2:38

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NEW YORK — Use of pitch clocks cut the average time of minor league games by 25 minutes this year, a reduction Major League Baseball hopes is replicated when the devices are installed in the big leagues next season.

The average time of minor league games dropped to 2 hours, 38 minutes in the season that ended Wednesday, according to the commissioner’s office. That was down from 3:03 during the 2021 season.

Clocks at Triple-A were set at 14 seconds with no runners on base and 19 with runners. At lower levels, the clocks were at 18 seconds with runners.

Big league nine-inning games are averaging 3:04 this season.

MLB announced on Sept. 9 that clocks will be introduced in the major leagues next year at 15 seconds with no runners and 20 seconds with runners, a decision opposed by the players’ association.

Pitchers are penalized a ball for violating the clock. In the minors, violations decreased from an average of 1.73 per game in the second week to 0.41 in week 24.

There will be a limit of two pickoff attempts or stepoffs per plate appearance, a rule that also was part of the minor league experiment this season. A third pickoff throw that is not successful would result in a balk.

Stolen bases increased to an average of 2.81 per game from 2.23 in the minors this year and the success rate rose to 78% from 68%.

Many offensive measurements were relatively stable: runs per team per game increased to 5.13 from 5.11 and batting average to .249 from .247.

Plate appearances resulting in home runs dropped to 2.7% from 2.8%, strikeouts declined to 24.4% from 25.4% and walks rose to 10.5% from 10.2%. Hit batters remained at 1.6%.