Robinson Cano’s dad says the Yankees “don’t seem to want” his son

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Last we heard, free agent second baseman Robinson Cano was reportedly on a private plane to Seattle to meet with the Mariners, who are prepared to offer him $225 million over the course of a nine-year contract. Meanwhile, the Yankees have been pretty firm about how high they are willing to go in negotiations. And as of now, it’s nowhere near $225 million.

According to Christian Red and Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, Cano’s father takes this rigid stance as a sign that the Yankees don’t want his son back.

The Yankees insist they want Robinson Cano to remain part of their pinstriped family. The patriarch of Cano’s actual family isn’t convinced that’s the case.

“The Yankees don’t seem to want him,” Jose Cano told the Daily News when asked about his son’s status with the Yankees.

The Yankees want him back, but the Mariners appear to be doing everything in their power to pry the All-Star second baseman away from New York.

Multiple reports Thursday night indicated the Mariners were readying a nine-year offer worth $225 million for Cano, who was on a plane headed for Seattle to meet with club officials.

A $225 million offer would dwarf the Yankees’ current seven-year offer of $165-170 million, leaving the Mariners more than $50 million ahead of the Bombers.

There are high stakes involved here and a lot of emotions at play, so we probably shouldn’t look into Cano’s comments too much. He’s talking about his son, after all. But this is a business and every team needs to draw a line somewhere. At the same time, you can’t blame Cano if he ends up signing for the most money possible, even it’s in Seattle. On a related note, you always have to wonder where these leaks about contract proposals come from and who would stand to benefit from them being reported. Just something to keep in mind amid the Hot Stove hysteria.

For what it’s worth, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman suggests that the Yankees could move on to Shin-Soo Choo and Omar Infante if Cano ends up choosing the Mariners.

UPDATE: Cano also spoke to Andrew Marchand of ESPN New York and said that his son is looking for a 10-year deal while the Yankees have only offered seven. He also indicated that he was irked by Brian Cashman’s comment from the GM Meetings that Cano “loves” money:

“I don’t know why he said that,” Jose Cano said. “I don’t know exactly everything. Tell me, who doesn’t love money?”

Cashman’s comment aside, Cano maintains that his first hope is for his son to remain with the Yankees.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?