Ryan Howard thinks he can be a 30-100 guy again

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This is a few days old, but per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard thinks he can still be a 30-100 guy (as in 30 home runs and 100 RBI). Howard has been slowed by injuries ever since he tore his Achilles tendon making the final out in Game 5 of the 2011 NLDS against the Cardinals. He missed the final three months of the 2013 season after tearing the meniscus in his left knee as well.

Howard, however, looks at what David Ortiz has accomplished and wonders “why not me?”

“Everybody in this league has experienced success on every level that they’ve played,” he said. “You have success and then you have a little bit of turmoil. It’s how you find a way to get back to that success, like Marlon Byrd, like David Ortiz. Age doesn’t play a factor.”

He continued:

“Can I be a 30-100 guy?” he said. “Yeah, I definitely think so. I believe in my ability. I hear what people say. It’s cool. You guys are all entitled to your opinions. But let’s say I come back and I do what I do. Then what? If I come back and put up numbers like ’07, ’08, ’09, then what? Are we having these conversations?”

Howard last accomplished the 30-100 feat in 2011 and he just turned 34 years old. Since 2010, the only players 34 years old or older to hit 30 homers and drive in 100 runs are Ortiz, Alfonso Soriano, Paul Konerko, and Alex Rodriguez. In the 2013 season alone, only ten players achieved the goal regardless of age: Ortiz, Soriano, Chris Davis, Miguel Cabrera, Pedro Alvarez, Paul Goldschmidt, Edwin Encarnacion, Mark Trumbo, Adam Jones, and Jay Bruce. The ten instances in 2013 are down from 19 in 2009.

Dale Murphy’s son hit in eye by rubber bullet during protest

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Atlanta Braves legend Dale Murphy took to Twitter last night and talked about his son, who was injured while taking part in a protest in Denver.

Murphy said his son nearly lost his eye after he was hit in the face by a rubber bullet while peacefully marching. He later shared a photo (see below). “Luckily, his eye was saved due to a kind stranger that was handing out goggles to protestors shortly before the shooting and another kind stranger that drove him to the ER,” Murphy said.

Murphy had far more to say about the protests, however, than how it related to his son:

“As terrible as this experience has been, we know that it’s practically nothing compared to the systemic racism and violence against Black life that he was protesting in the first place. Black communities across America have been terrorized for centuries by excessive police force . . . If you’re a beneficiary of systemic racism, then you will not be able to dismantle it at no cost to yourself. You will have to put yourself at risk. It might not always result in being physically attacked, but it will require you to make yourself vulnerable.”