Major League Baseball releases its annual drug test report

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The annual public report from the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program’s Independent Program Administrator has been released by Major League Baseball. The stats:

  • There were 5,391 total drug tests. 4,022 were urine samples, 1,369 were blood samples;
  • There were eight positive tests resulting in discipline. All were for stimulants. Seven of the stimulant tests were for Adderall. One for Methylhexaneamine. I guess that means that there are no more steroids in baseball. Yay!
  • There were 13 “non-analytical positives.” That’s baseball code for “Biogenesis dudes.”
  • There were 122 therapeutic use exemptions for otherwise banned drugs.  119 of them were for ADD drugs like Adderall. Three were three for hypogonadism. A couple of years ago here was only one for hypogonadism, so that’s on the uptick. On the bright side, two years ago there was a therapeutic use exemption for narcolepsy and now there is none. So the narcoleptic either got better or retired.

The most interesting thing here, to me anyway, continues to be the number of Adderall-users in baseball. It’s estimated that 4.7% of the adult population has ADD. 119 of roughly 1,200 major leaguers on 40-man rosters puts the ADD rate at nearly 10%. Back that number down a little bit for the various guys that shuffle in and out of 400-man rosters and you figure that baseball players have ADD diagnosis at around twice the level of that in the normal population.

Are baseball players more likely to have ADD than the rest of the adult population? Are they just more likely to be diagnosed that way? Or are therapeutic use exemptions for ADD drugs a means of getting something ballplayers have always found beneficial — stimulants — in a legal way?

Report: Six teams are in on Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki
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At least six teams are interested in free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, according to a recent report from Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Known suitors include the Cubs, who will reportedly be in attendance during one of the shortstop’s offseason workouts as they decide whether or not to press forward with a deal.

The Blue Jays released Tulowitzki on Tuesday as general manager Ross Atkins admitted he couldn’t rely on the 34-year-old to bounce back from season-ending bone spur removal surgery and be the kind of consistent presence the club needed going forward. Toronto is expected to absorb the remaining $38 million on Tulowitzki’s contract, which includes the $20 million he’s due in 2019, another $14 million in 2020 and a $4 million buyout in 2021.

The veteran slugger will be available to any interested team at a minimum $600,000, an undeniably attractive bargain if he recovers in advance of the 2019 season. He last appeared in the majors in 2017 and slashed .249/.300/.378 with 17 extra-base hits and a .678 OPS through 260 PA. Per Slusser, Tulowitzki appears to be angling for a job with the Athletics — even going so far as to say he’d be willing to switch positions in order to play for a winning team — though they have yet to reach out about a potential deal this winter.