Dodgers, Hanley Ramirez working on contract extension

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The Dodgers and shortstop Hanley Ramirez could get a contract extension done over the winter, reports Dionisio Soldevila of ESPN Deportes. Ramirez has one more year and $16 million remaining on the six-year, $70 million extension he signed with the Marlins back in May 2008.

Ramirez turns 30 years old in December. Despite injuries limiting his playing time in 2011 (shoulder surgery) and 2013 (thumb surgery, strained hamstring), he is rated as the second-best hitting shortstop in baseball since 2011, according to FanGraphs. Going by weighted on-base average (wOBA), Ramirez’s .353 mark trails only Troy Tulowitzki (.390).

Ramirez was a big reason why the Dodgers were able to get past the Braves in the 2013 NLDS. In four games, Ramirez had eight hits (six of them for extra bases) in 18 trips to the plate. Unfortunately, he was hit in the ribs by Cardinals starter Joe Kelly in Game 1 of the NLCS, which rendered him ineffective for the rest of the series. However, his post-season performance will be yet one more factor in Ramirez’s favor when negotiating a new contract. Also relevant is the contract shortstop Jhonny Peralta just signed with the Cardinals — $52 million over four years — as Ramirez is considered to be of a higher grade.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.