Diamondbacks working on deal with Daniel Hudson

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Daniel Hudson has made just nine starts since the beginning of the 2012 regular season due to elbow issues and is expected to miss a majority of the 2014 season while recovering from his second Tommy John reconstructive surgery in two years.

The Diamondbacks can get rid of the arbitration-eligible right-hander this winter by declining to tender him a contract. But that’s not in the club’s plans.

According to MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert, the Diamondbacks front office has begun negotiations on a deal for 2014 with Hudson, who made just over the league minimum this summer. “We’ve finally started kicking tires on something,” confirmed the 26-year-old starter on Wednesday night. “Hopefully we’ll get something done in the next few days or over the weekend. Obviously my wife and I have our roots set down here. We’d like to be here for the long run, and I’d like to have a long career with the Diamondbacks.”

Hudson, 26, owns a promising 3.68 career ERA and 1.209 career WHIP in 381 1/3 major league frames. It won’t cost more than $1 million for Arizona to keep him around and hope for a full, successful return.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.