The postseason playoff shares were announced

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There used to be a time when postseason money was bigger than most players’ actual salaries. That’s not the case any longer, but the money is still pretty good.

This year the a full postseason share broke down as follows:

  • Boston Red Sox: $307,322.68
  • St. Louis Cardinals: $228,300.17
  • Detroit Tigers: $129,278.22
  • Los Angeles Dodgers: $108,037.06
  • Atlanta Braves: $34,012.30
  • Oakland A’s: $37,316.25
  • Pittsburgh Pirates: $35,558.58
  • Tampa Bay Rays: $35,280.10
  • Cincinnati Reds: $15,284.85
  • Cleveland Indians: $15,107.00

Each team can vote how many full shares to allocate. They can also issue partial shares and cash awards. It’s overall pool for player shares comes from 50 percent of the gate receipts from the Wild Card Games, 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series.

Now gonna go listen to Patti Smith’s “Free Money.”

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.