Should the White Sox sign Paul Konerko for old time’s sake?

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Seems crazy. Seems like, based on his age and a batting line of .244/.313/.355 last season that Paul Konerko is kaput. But Rick Morrissey argues that, even if Konerko is finished, the Sox should sign him. For old time’s sake:

There is no measure from 2013 that would make you want Konerko on your roster, not at his age (he’ll turn 38 during spring training) and not with the nagging injuries that always seem to be tugging at him. He went .244/.313/.355 last season. The metrics crowd would suggest euthanasia is in order. But Konerko has meant so much to this franchise, and that’s why the Sox are leaving his return up to him …  What does Konerko bring to the table? Wrong question. What has he brought to the table? Better.

Morrissey adds that we should take into account the fact that Konerko is a good leader in that he talked to the media every day so his teammates didn’t have to. And that he’s well thought-of in the organization and among his teammates.

All of which is a great argument to make Konerko a coach. Nowhere, however, is there a half-decent argument in there to bring him back as a first baseman.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.