What in the heck is A-Rod doing?

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Watching another afternoon train wreck involving Alex Rodriguez and Major League Baseball, I feel like it’s worth remembering two things:

1. Alex Rodriguez could have used PEDs like crazy, but still not have deserved a 211-game suspension; and

2. Bud Selig can have it in for A-Rod — could wish to see him burn at a stake as punishment for everyone else’s sins — yet still not be outside of his authority in suspending A-Rod.

We forget that as we spring to the defense of one side or another. Or, more often, as we spring to scorn one side or the other. But the fact is that each side is speaking some truth and each side is peddling baloney.

My personal view is that Major League Baseball overreached pretty severely in the penalty it leveled, and that a straightforward attack of that penalty as excessive by Alex Rodriguez and his legal team would serve as the best way for them to prevail. They still may do that. The arbitrator may be able to tune out all of this noise and focus solely on whether the punishment fits the crime, concluding that no, it doesn’t. If that happens, A-Rod could get a 50-game suspension, maybe. Or maybe nothing if MLB’s evidence and investigation is viewed as flawed or infirm.

But I also believe that A-Rod and Joe Tacopina are taking a gigantic risk in making this arbitration about Bud Selig personally and some vendetta against A-Rod in general. They risk alienating the arbitrator. They risk having a proportionality-of-punishment case lost in the noise. All for the promise of trying a lawsuit that, if the percentages on such things hold, never sees the light of day in court. I don’t understand why they’re doing this, but I feel like they are running the risk of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.

Normally one can see the motivations of putatively irrational action like this. But I don’t see the percentage for Alex Rodriguez in this approach. I don’t see what he possibly stands to gain by blowing up the arbitration like he has.

Hyun-Jin Ryu likely to accept the Dodgers’ qualifying offer

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MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand reports that, while there is no official word yet, Hyun-Jin Ryu will “most likely” accept the Dodgers’ one-year, $17.9 million qualifying offer.

Ryu posted a 1.97 ERA in to 82.1 regular-season innings, with his season shortened due to recovery from injury. He was pretty darn good in the postseason too, though his ERA was inflated somewhat thanks to Ryan Madson allowing his inherited runners to score like it was his job or something. Either way: given his durability issues over the past few seasons, it’s not at all clear that there was a massive multi-year deal in the offing for the soon-to-be-32-year-old pitcher, so accepting the qualifying offer is probably a pretty good move for him.

All players who received a qualifying offer have until 5PM today to make a decision on them. Others, besides Ryu, who got them: Yasmani Grandal, Patrick Corbin, Bryce Harper, Dallas Keuchel, Craig Kimbrel, and A.J. Pollock.