Wanna buy the Metrodome baggie?

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Once the Vikings season is over the Metrodome in Minnesota will be torn down and Doug Beldon of the St. Paul Pioneer Press writes that they’re selling off various parts of the stadium, including the outfield wall baggie:

More than a dozen items used at the Dome in downtown Minneapolis are posted on the state’s online auction site for the next week or so, and more will be offered as they become available. …

Two bids had been submitted for a pallet of six wall-mounted benches, and another for 100 padded folding chairs. About a dozen bidders were vying for a generator and a tractor with loader, and a few were interested in a mechanical broom. Other items being auctioned include flooring used at concerts, a field-turf groomer, a water-source heat pump and sheets of foam insulation.

I’d have my eye on the pitcher’s mound and the right field baggie, although having your own “field-turf groomer” could obviously come in handy.

Also of note: My friends and I are trying to rent out the Metrodome in its final days for a co-ed wiffle ball tournament, but so far our attempt has been met with a surprising level of resistance. Might need a Make-A-Wish style intervention.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.