Report: MLB impeded a Florida Department of Health investigation when it bought Biogenesis docs

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Hey, I realize that an actual arm of the Florida government tasked with protecting the health and welfare of Florida citizens has a job to do, but that crap has to go by the wayside when Major League Baseball is getting bad publicity and Bud Selig has a legacy to secure. It’s all about priorities, people:

Major League Baseball officials impeded a Florida Department of Health investigation of Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch by purchasing clinic documents they likely knew had been stolen and had been warned not to obtain, sources close to the investigation told “Outside the Lines.” . . . A state official said the limited scope of the investigation and its conclusion were direct results of MLB officials purchasing documents related to the since-shuttered clinic at the center of a performance-enhancing drug scandal involving Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Braun and at least a dozen other players.

As I’ve said numerous times: I don’t much doubt that Alex Rodriguez and others used PEDs. But I also don’t believe for an instant that Major League Baseball’s efforts to take them down for it are in any way reasonable or proportional to the severity of the players’ transgressions.

If this source is correct, PED-hysteria in baseball has now directly impeded a state investigation. Was this all really worth it?

UPDATE: Excellent point here too:

 

Cue A-Rod with the “I LEARNED IT FROM YOU, DAD!” speech.

Brewers have 3 positive COVID tests at alternate site

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
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MILWAUKEE — The Brewers had two players and a staff member test positive for the coronavirus at their alternate training site in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed the positive results Saturday and said they shouldn’t impact the major league team. Teams are using alternate training sites this season to keep reserve players sharp because the minor league season was canceled due to the pandemic.

Stearns said the positive tests came Monday and did not name the two players or the staff member. Players must give their permission for their names to be revealed after positive tests.

The entire camp was placed in quarantine.

“We have gone through contact tracing,” Stearns said. “We do not believe it will have any impact at all on our major league team. We’ve been fortunate to get through this season relatively unscathed in this area. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get all the way there at our alternate site.”

Milwaukee entered Saturday one game behind the Reds and Cardinals for second place in the NL Central, with the top two teams qualifying for the postseason.

The Brewers still will be able to take taxi squad players with them on the team’s trip to Cincinnati and St. Louis in the final week of the season. He said those players have had repeated negative tests and the team is “confident” there would be no possible spread of the virus.

“Because of the nature of who these individuals were, it’s really not going to affect the quarantine group at all,” Stearns said. “We’re very fortunate that the group of players who could potentially be on a postseason roster for us aren’t interacting all that much with the individuals that tested positive.”