Scherzer, Kershaw go from Cy Young to contract negotiations

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It’s been just a little more than 12 hours since Max Scherzer and Clayton Kershaw were named Cy Young Award winners. But we’re already turning to the next chapter in their stories: where they’ll be long term.

Following some speculation that the Tigers could seek to trade Scherzer, who has a year left on his current deal, MLB.com’s Jason Beck reports that Scherzer is open to a contract extension with the Tigers.

“I am open (to a new deal),” Scherzer said. “I realize I’ve got a good situation here in Detroit. But it also takes two to dance … I don’t have any [anxiety] to get anything done, but if something does get done, I’d be happy to do it.”

It’s not entirely clear what kind of deal Scherzer could command. Given his steady improvement over the past two and a half seasons you can’t call his 2013 a fluke, but I don’t feel like there’s a consensus as to whether he is coming off a decided peak career year and will return to being merely good or if he’s now on a nice plateau where he can be expected to be an elite starter for 3-4 more seasons. Dave Dombrowski has to figure that out and the process of figuring that out is what will determine whether Scherzer is dangled or locked up.

Clayton Kershaw is less of an uncertainty. He’s now got two Cy Young Awards and a second placy Cy Young finish in the past three seasons, is three years younger than Scherzer and, barring injury, is clearly a guy who is beginning to put together the peak seasons of a Hall of Famer. As a result of that, he seems far more philosophical about inking a long term deal now:

 

It was reported in October that the Dodgers had offered Kershaw a $300 million extension during the season or, at the very least, had begun discussions in that direction. That he can look at that and still talk about just having one year ahead of him is pretty close to the dictionary definition of the word “cool.” Whatever the case, though, whether it’s the Dodgers or someone else, Kershaw is going to get a record deal for a pitcher when it’s all said and done.

Two Cy Young award winners who, in the next year or so, could have different addresses. Gentlemen: open your wallets.

Pitch clock cut minor league games by 25 minutes to 2:38

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NEW YORK — Use of pitch clocks cut the average time of minor league games by 25 minutes this year, a reduction Major League Baseball hopes is replicated when the devices are installed in the big leagues next season.

The average time of minor league games dropped to 2 hours, 38 minutes in the season that ended Wednesday, according to the commissioner’s office. That was down from 3:03 during the 2021 season.

Clocks at Triple-A were set at 14 seconds with no runners on base and 19 with runners. At lower levels, the clocks were at 18 seconds with runners.

Big league nine-inning games are averaging 3:04 this season.

MLB announced on Sept. 9 that clocks will be introduced in the major leagues next year at 15 seconds with no runners and 20 seconds with runners, a decision opposed by the players’ association.

Pitchers are penalized a ball for violating the clock. In the minors, violations decreased from an average of 1.73 per game in the second week to 0.41 in week 24.

There will be a limit of two pickoff attempts or stepoffs per plate appearance, a rule that also was part of the minor league experiment this season. A third pickoff throw that is not successful would result in a balk.

Stolen bases increased to an average of 2.81 per game from 2.23 in the minors this year and the success rate rose to 78% from 68%.

Many offensive measurements were relatively stable: runs per team per game increased to 5.13 from 5.11 and batting average to .249 from .247.

Plate appearances resulting in home runs dropped to 2.7% from 2.8%, strikeouts declined to 24.4% from 25.4% and walks rose to 10.5% from 10.2%. Hit batters remained at 1.6%.