County Commissioner: The Braves will pay 55% of the new ballpark’s construction costs

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With the caveat being that the devil is in the details, a couple of Cobb County Commissioners spoke to the Marietta Daily Journal about the financing for the new Braves ballpark. And they say the Braves are paying 55% of the cost:

“The other 45 percent will be funded without a tax increase for over 95 percent of Cobb County residents,” [county chairman Tim] Lee said. “This is a public-private partnership and the Braves are paying for 55 percent of the cost.”

Commissioner Helen Goreham, who has been reviewing the proposal, said she is a fan.

“I’m very comfortable with it,” Goreham said. “The taxpayers are going to be pleased with the arrangement that is going to be shared with the media very shortly.”

Worth noting that Goreham also said that “I believe that those who are going to benefit the most from the Braves moving to Cobb County will be the ones that will be making the largest investment in it.” Which makes one wonder: if the Braves are at 55% and the ones that benefit the most will be the largest investors, can we dispense with the notion that this will be a boon to residents?

Haha, just kidding. They’re gonna continue doing that. They’ll also continue to be cagey about how much of a public investment it is. That “without a tax increase for 95 percent of residents” comment is spin, of course, as is any situation in which you ask for numbers and someone tells you who isn’t paying.

Details are supposed to come out on November 26. Until then, view this kind of talk as primarily a sales pitch with the details that do come out being only those which benefit the folks making the sale.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.