The Red Sox “really want” Tim Hudson

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Not even mid-November yet and we’re already into the “do they like him or do they like like him?” phase of free agency. With the Red Sox and Tim Hudson, they seem to like like him, reports Jon Heyman. Heyman adds that the Sox are “big admirers” of Hudson and that they “really want him.”

He is attractive. For one thing he’s bald, and bald is beautiful. For another thing he’s a free agent pitcher who neither will require a really long contract nor has a qualifying offer attached to him, thereby not costing a would-be signing team a draft pick. And he’s still a decent pitcher at age 38, having gone 8-7 with a 3.97 ERA in 21 starts last year.

It was only 21 starts because of the broken ankle he suffered in that game against the Mets. On that score, David O’Brein of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that Hudson had a screw removed from his ankle today and will be cleared to run in couple of weeks. So all signs point to him being ready for spring training.

Marlins designate Derek Dietrich for assignment

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The Marlins designated utilityman Derek Dietrich for assignment, Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports. This comes amid a flurry of moves on Tuesday night as teams prepare their rosters ahead of the Rule 5 draft next month.

Dietrich, 29, is coming off another strong season in which he hit .265/.330/.421 with 16 home runs, 45 RBI, and 72 runs scored in 551 plate appearances. He played all over the diamond, spending most of his time in left field and at first base. Dietrich also played some second base, third base, and right field.

Dietrich is entering his third of four years of arbitration eligibility. He earned $2.9 million this past season and MLB Trade Rumors projects him to earn $4.8 million in 2019. Cutting Dietrich represents a bit more than 4 million in savings for the rebuilding and perennially small-market Marlins. Dietrich should draw some interest, so the Marlins could end up trading him rather soon.

Wonder how J.T. Realmuto, now the longest-tenured Marlin, is feeling right about now.