Submariner Shunsuke Watanabe wants to pitch in the U.S.

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Patrick Newman of NPB Tracker tweeted an article a few hours ago reporting that Japanese submarine pitcher Shunsuke Watanabe intends to pitch in the United States. The article is in Japanese, but I take Patrick’s (and Google Translate’s) word for it.

You may remember Watanabe from the 2006 World Baseball Classic. If the name doesn’t ring a bell, the pitching motion certainly will:

That is some serious submarine action. Dan Quisenberry looks down from Pitching Valhalla watches that and says “damn.” Chad Bradford, when reached for comment, presumably said “dude, that’s nuts.”

But optics are one thing. Baseball significance is another. And as far as that goes, well, eh. I dunno. At this point in his career Watanabe does not exactly profile as someone who is gonna do well here. He’s 37 for one thing. For some reason he only pitched in six games last season for Chiba Lotte, which could suggest an injury. Either way, though, Newman says his velocity is only in the 70s. While he has deception on his side he doesn’t strike guys out at all. Really: over the past few seasons he’s struggled to reach three Ks per nine innings.

And if he doesn’t deceive hitters? According to his Wikipedia page, back in a 2004 exhibition David Ortiz hit a 525 foot home run off him, which was the longest ever homer hit in the Tokyo Dome.

Anyway: could be interesting. Could amount to absolutely nothing. But you’re gonna want to watch him pitch if he does make the jump.

Nationals’ Stephen Strasburg’s status for 2023 ‘a mystery’

Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK — Stephen Strasburg‘s status for 2023 is up in the air after a series of injuries that limited him to one start this season, Washington Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo said.

“It’s still a little bit of a mystery,” Rizzo said about the 2019 World Series MVP before the Nationals were scheduled to play a doubleheader at the New York Mets. “I know that he’s working hard strengthening his core and the other parts of his body. We’re just going to have to see. With the type of surgery and rehab that he’s had, it’s unfamiliar to us. It’s unfamiliar to a lot of people. We’re going to have to take it day by day.”

The 34-year-old right-hander has thrown a total of 31 1/3 innings across just eight starts over the past three seasons combined. He had carpal tunnel surgery in 2020, then needed an operation to correct thoracic outlet syndrome in 2021.

After his only start of 2022, he went back on the injured list with a stress reaction of the ribs.

“We’ll have to see where the rehab process takes us later on in the winter,” Rizzo said. “We’re going to monitor him. He’s local, so we’ll see him all the time and we’ll see where he’s at going into spring training mode.”

Strasburg is a three-time All-Star who signed a $245 million contract after helping Washington win a championship in 2019.

He is 113-62 with a 3.24 ERA for his career.

Meeting with reporters toward the end of a rough season – Washington entered with a majors-worst and Nationals-worst record of 55-104 and shipped away the team’s best player, outfielder Juan Soto, at the trade deadline – Rizzo talked about doing “an autopsy of the organization.”

“I look at the season as a disappointment. I’ve always said that you are what your record says you are, and our record says we’re the worst team in the league right now. It’s hard to argue with that,” Rizzo said. “The flip side of that is we’re in a process.”

Rizzo and manager Dave Martinez were given contract extensions during the season. Martinez said his entire coaching staff will return next year.