The Indians are still peddling the bogus Louis Sockalexis story

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If you ask most people how the Cleveland Indians got their name, they will tell you it has something to do with Louis Francis Sockalexis, a Native American who played 94 games across three seasons for the Cleveland Spiders at the end of the 19th century. The story goes that the team was given that name in honor of Sockalexis, as he was allegedly a fan favorite or fun-loving or something like that.

It’s total bunk, by the way. The Indians own media guide notes that sportswriters at the time — 1915 — surveyed fans for a name and the Indians stuck, most likely because the 1914 Braves were seen as a surprising and inspiration team and others wanted to ape them to some degree. There’s also the little fact that Sockalexis hadn’t been associated with the team in any way and that he died in his early 40s as a very sick and mostly forgotten alcoholic two years before the name was changed.

But it sure is a nice story. Sort of like the Abner Doubleday baseball-creation myth.

Except the Indians, at least in some instances, still believe it. Or else want fans to believe it. What else explains a letter from the team to a fan who wrote them complaining about Chief Wahoo and the Indians’ use of Native American iconography. You can read it over at Cleveland Frowns, who keeps close track of all Chief Wahoo-related things.

If the Indians want to keep their name and their mascot and everything that goes with it, there is nothing that can stop them. They are a private business and they can do whatever they’d like. If they actually believed that the choices they made in this regard were good ones, however, they wouldn’t resort to blatant lies in order to justify them.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.