A ticket for Game 6 is probably the most expensive ticket in baseball history

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BOSTON — A possible World Series clinching game in a baseball-crazy city played in one of the smallest parks in Major League Baseball? Short supply meet huge demand.

Jeff Passan of Yahoo! reported that by early afternoon yesterday the average resale price for tickets sold on the secondary market was over $1,000, with some online inventory currently listing for in excess of $2,000.

Whether that’s wishful thinking by the resellers, I have no idea. But it’s certainly not just a resale price from an isolated entrepreneur. I was walking around Boston yesterday and overheard several conversations in which phrases like ” … that’s just too much money” or “Jesus Christ, I’m not spending a thousand bucks for a ticket …” were uttered, so the notion that no one is getting in to Fenway tonight for less than an arm and a leg is pretty widespread.

Either way: these are Super Bowl-level prices. For a baseball game. A John Lackey start at that! Nothing I ever thought I’d see.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.