A ticket for Game 6 is probably the most expensive ticket in baseball history

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BOSTON — A possible World Series clinching game in a baseball-crazy city played in one of the smallest parks in Major League Baseball? Short supply meet huge demand.

Jeff Passan of Yahoo! reported that by early afternoon yesterday the average resale price for tickets sold on the secondary market was over $1,000, with some online inventory currently listing for in excess of $2,000.

Whether that’s wishful thinking by the resellers, I have no idea. But it’s certainly not just a resale price from an isolated entrepreneur. I was walking around Boston yesterday and overheard several conversations in which phrases like ” … that’s just too much money” or “Jesus Christ, I’m not spending a thousand bucks for a ticket …” were uttered, so the notion that no one is getting in to Fenway tonight for less than an arm and a leg is pretty widespread.

Either way: these are Super Bowl-level prices. For a baseball game. A John Lackey start at that! Nothing I ever thought I’d see.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.