Red Sox use Xander Bogaerts lead-off triple to cut their deficit to 2-1 in the fifth inning

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Red Sox rookie phenom Xander Bogaerts helped the Red Sox finally get to Cardinals starter Joe Kelly in the fifth inning of Game 3. The 21-year-old hit a slicing liner to right-center, tailing away from center fielder Jon Jay. Right fielder Carlos Beltran gave chase and attempted to cut it off after it landed, but the ball skipped under his glove to the wall. Bogaerts raced around to third base with ease for a lead-off triple. Jarrod Saltalamacchia drew a walk to set up runners on the corners with no outs.

As quickly as they had set themselves up with a golden opportunity, the Red Sox appeared just as eager to see it disappear. Stephen Drew struck out, meaning the Cardinals were one ground ball double play from escaping danger. They almost got it, as Mike Carp hit a slow chopper to second base, but Matt Carpenter could only get the out at second base as Bogaerts scored to make it 2-1 in favor of the Cardinals. Jacoby Ellsbury struck out on a 96 MPH fastball to end the inning.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.