Carlos Martinez, Trevor Rosenthal own the late innings for Cardinals

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Even as Michael Wacha was through five scoreless, one thing seemed pretty clear: his pitch count up to 90, the sixth would be his final inning.

That sixth inning didn’t go as planned, but the seventh through ninth innings sure did. The Cardinals rallied from 2-1 down beat the Red Sox 4-2 in Game 2, with Carlos Martinez and Trevor Rosenthal striking out six in three scoreless innings of relief.

Martinez, who initially signed with the Red Sox out of the Dominican Republic, only to land with the Cardinals after MLB voided the deal, got six outs. After a clean seventh, he got into trouble by giving up a pair of groundball singles in the eighth. However, he was able to get Mike Napoli to pop out to end the rally.

Rosenthal got the bottom of the Boston’s order, which has produced nothing in October, and made quick work of Jonny Gomes, Jarrod Saltalamacchia and pinch-hitter Daniel Nava, striking out all three.

As good as Edward Mujica was for the Cardinals for most of the season, the team probably caught a break when he was injured down the stretch, rendering him ineffective and resulting in Rosenthal going into the closer’s role. It’s possible — perhaps not likely, but possible — that Martinez wouldn’t have even made the postseason roster if not for Mujica’s injury. He was only handed his first late lead with 10 days to go in the regular season. Mujica was far more likely to have a Joaquin Benoit moment against these Red Sox than either of the young gunslingers are. Rosenthal and Martinez have combined to allow five homers in 121 1/3 innings this season.

At least the Red Sox have had a look at both now. They actually got a run off Martinez in Game 1. Rosenthal is nothing if not predictable; it’s nothing but high-90s fastballs and hit them if you can. Few do. The Red Sox will certainly see Martinez again, and probably Rosenthal, too, if the Cardinals can continue taking leads into the ninth. Against the Tigers, the Red Sox’s best hope was to outlast the starters and prey on the pen. Versus these Cardinals, especially the next two games with Joe Kelly and Lance Lynn starting, they’re going to have to feast on the starters some in order to prevail.

Report: Hanley Ramirez “eyed” in federal and state investigation

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Former Red Sox first baseman Hanley Ramirez is reportedly being “eyed” in an ongoing federal and state investigation, per Michele McPhee of ABC News. McPhee did not elaborate on the exact nature of the investigation itself, but provided a few more details during an interview with 98.5 The Sports Hub on Friday:

“Obviously, I know absolutely nothing about sports or Hanley Ramirez’s stats, but what I do know is crime,” McPhee said. “And there has been some reports about a FaceTime phone call that was made between a man during a car stop. After that car stop, police recovered a significant amount of drugs. And during that car stop, the suspect claimed that one of the items found in the vehicle belonged to Hanley Ramirez and then FaceTimed [Ramirez] in front of police. And that car stop coordinated with the timing of his release from the Red Sox.”

McPhee further clarified that she thinks the suspect — who was reportedly transporting 435 grams of fentanyl and a “large amount” of crack cocaine — was tied to “a sweeping federal case involving a substantial ring that’s being operated out of Lawrence, Massachusetts.”

Ramirez, the Red Sox, and Major League Baseball have all denied knowledge of any current investigation. According to the Boston Globe’s Alex Speier, Red Sox VP of media relations Kevin Gregg insisted that Ramirez had been dropped from the team for baseball reasons alone and had not been made aware of an investigation at the time of his release.

“Hanley has no knowledge of any of the allegations contained in this media report and he is not aware of any investigation,” the infielder’s agent, Adam Katz, added Friday.

The 34-year-old Ramirez was designated for assignment on May 25 and became a free agent on June 1. Prior to his release, he batted .254/.313/.395 over 195 plate appearances, 302 shy of the 497-PA threshold he would have needed to cross in order to activate his vesting option for 2019. He’s still owed the remainder of his $22 million salary for 2018.