The retired Marine who sang “God Bless America” last night was not a retired Marine

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Which isn’t to say he was a fraud or anything like that. The man who sang “God Bless America” during last night’s game was a Marine and he had permission from the Marines to wear the uniform. And, based on his back story — he’s a former state trooper who served with distinction — he seems like a fine man.

But as Deadspin reports today, he was not a “retired” Marine as that term is typically employed. And, all things being equal, he should not have been permitted to wear his Marine uniform due to the regulations which attach to Marines who have separated from service. It’s an interesting read, so go check it out.

My view: this is the result, I think, of the extreme level of militarism and patriotism to the point of jingoism that has come to characterize Major League Baseball’s big events. It’s become such an imperative in the minds of the league that they — or whoever allowed this — is now willing to risk skirting the normal rules of military decorum in order to have a guy in uniform on the field snapping a salute in dress blues. As if it would be awful to not have a uniformed serviceman sing a song.  As Deadspin’s story makes clear, though, the league does so at the cost of ticking off some Marine veterans, and at some point we have to ask ourselves if we’ve gone overboard with this stuff.

Tonight: The Anthem and “America the Beautiful” (which should be the Anthem in my view and is way better than “God Bless America”) will be sung by James Taylor. Let me preempt all of tomorrow’s controversy, though, by getting it out there: though he will likely be described as a “singer/songwriter” tonight, two of his biggest hits were written by Carole King and the Holland, Dozier, Holland songwriting team, respectively.

Rockies expect Seunghwan Oh back in 2019

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Rockies reliever Seunghwan Oh recently said to the Yonhap News Agency that he wanted to return to South Korea to finish out his career. He has one year and $2.5 million remaining. His 2019 club option became guaranteed when he reached 70 appearances in the 2018 regular season. It sounded like Oh didn’t want to pitch for the Rockies next season. Oh said, “I am a bit exhausted after spending five seasons in Japan and the United States. I feel like I want to return to the KBO while I still have the energy to help the team and pitch in front of home fans. I can’t make this decision alone. I’ll have to speak with my agency about the next season.”

Rockies GM Jeff Bridich has a different sense of the situation, per Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post. Bridich said, “From what we have been told, it was much ado about nothing regarding Oh. His comments to the Korean media were not specifically about 2019. It was more about ending his career there. Our understanding is that he has every intention of honoring his current contract.”

Oh, 36, pitched 68 1/3 innings this past season between the Blue Jays (47 innings) and Rockies (21 1/3). In aggregate, he posted a 2.63 ERA with a 79/17 K/BB ratio in 68 1/3 innings. The Rockies have the bulk of their bullpen returning next year, save for Adam Ottavino who is a free agent.