The Indians are surveying attitudes about Chief Wahoo

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Well, not just Chief Wahoo. Lots of things. But Wahoo is in there.

Via my friend Monte the Color Man, the Indians are sending out surveys to people who have purchased tickets through their website or who are otherwise registered there, and it covers all manner of topics. In-game experience, uniform styles and expectations about the Indians’ future.

But there are a couple of questions in the middle that piqued my interest:

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The Indians have said directly that they are not considering any changes in the logo and that they’re not moving to marginalize the Chief Wahoo logo.  But they are interested in fan sentiment on the matter, so that’s interesting.

Of course, the issue here isn’t whether Chief Wahoo is popular. He is. The issue is that, popularity be damned, he’s offensive, so I would hope that the Indians would make a decision to eliminate the logo out of simple decency, not because of some poll results.

Not that the poll results will inspire them to do it, I’ll bet. After all, the Wahoo logo’s popularity comes by virtue of fans who are attached to it out of nostalgia and team dedication. Thus, by sampling opinion of people who seek out Indians tickets and/or merchandise in the first place, it’ll probably skew towards favoring the ugly thing.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.