Karma helped the Red Sox win the ALCS? Um, OK.

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Mitch Albom has made a boatload of money telling stories in recent years. Way more than he’s made writing and analyzing about sports.  So while sports is his day job, it’s not at all surprising that he’s big on inserting dramatic narrative into things.  For example, from his column yesterday, talking about why the Red Sox beat the Tigers in the ALCS:

The Tigers were simply beaten by a faster, more defensive, more opportunistic team with a finer bullpen and — and this is important — better karma. You didn’t realize until you got to Fenway and saw the B Strong carved into the outfield grass and hanging on the Green Monster wall, how much the Boston Marathon bombings six months ago gave unity and purpose to this team and city, kind of like the New Orleans Saints and Hurricane Katrina or the New York Yankees and 9/11.

This week a lot of reporters who don’t spend a lot of time covering baseball will ask the Red Sox about the Marathon Bombing and their beards and all manner of other things that make for better stories than they do baseball analysis.  And it’ll be fine because the World Series draws reporters to the game who don’t normally cover baseball so, for them, that angle is new and fresh.

Not sure what Albom’s excuse is. Not sure how, in this day and age, a reporter is able to get away with claiming that “karma” and some external “unity and purpose” had an “important” bearing on the outcome of a sporting event. But good for Mitch all the same.

Brewers have 3 positive COVID tests at alternate site

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
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MILWAUKEE — The Brewers had two players and a staff member test positive for the coronavirus at their alternate training site in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed the positive results Saturday and said they shouldn’t impact the major league team. Teams are using alternate training sites this season to keep reserve players sharp because the minor league season was canceled due to the pandemic.

Stearns said the positive tests came Monday and did not name the two players or the staff member. Players must give their permission for their names to be revealed after positive tests.

The entire camp was placed in quarantine.

“We have gone through contact tracing,” Stearns said. “We do not believe it will have any impact at all on our major league team. We’ve been fortunate to get through this season relatively unscathed in this area. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get all the way there at our alternate site.”

Milwaukee entered Saturday one game behind the Reds and Cardinals for second place in the NL Central, with the top two teams qualifying for the postseason.

The Brewers still will be able to take taxi squad players with them on the team’s trip to Cincinnati and St. Louis in the final week of the season. He said those players have had repeated negative tests and the team is “confident” there would be no possible spread of the virus.

“Because of the nature of who these individuals were, it’s really not going to affect the quarantine group at all,” Stearns said. “We’re very fortunate that the group of players who could potentially be on a postseason roster for us aren’t interacting all that much with the individuals that tested positive.”