Prince Fielder: “It’s over, bro”

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Prince Fielder was by no means the biggest reason the Tigers lost to the Red Sox in six games in the ALCS. But the Tigers are paying him $214 million over nine years and he had just four hits (three singles and a double) in 24 trips to the plate against Sox pitching, so he has been a magnet for criticism. He also made a costly base running gaffe in the sixth inning of Game 6, getting caught down the third base line by catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and making a failed attempt to belly-flop back to third base.

Some players would be outwardly upset or remorseful that they are no longer playing for a championship. Fans like this because they are able to grieve vicariously through their team’s players. For Prince Fielder, though, he isn’t letting the missed opportunities get to him. Via MLB.com’s Alden Gonzalez:

“You have to be a man about it,” he added. “I have kids. If I’m sitting around pouting about it, how am I going to tell them to keep their chins or keep their heads up when something doesn’t go their way? It’s over.

“It isn’t really tough, man, for me [to move on]. It’s over. I have kids I have to take care of, so, for me it’s over, bro.”

Told fans may be upset to hear him shake off a disappointing loss so quickly, Fielder said: “They don’t play.”

As much as the “they don’t play” defense rings hollow, the fans and the media shouldn’t be in the business of dictating how a player should react and feel at any time. If this is how Fielder deals with failure, all the more power to him.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.