For Tigers and Dodgers, injuries make you wonder what could have been

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Cardinals starter Michael Wacha went home with the NLCS MVP hardware, but perhaps it should have gone to Joe Kelly. Kelly started off the series by drilling shortstop Hanley Ramirez — one of the most productive players during the regular season, and a godsend to the Dodgers in the NLDS — in the ribs with a 95 MPH fastball. Tests later confirmed that Ramirez suffered a cracked rib, but he played through it for the rest of the series. He was ineffective, logging just two hits (both singles) in 19 trips to the plate.

Meanwhile, the Tigers watched a hobbled Miguel Cabrera play out the final two months of the regular season. At one point, he was in a position to take the lead in all three Triple Crown categories, but slowed by a groin injury, Chris Davis jumped far ahead in the home run race. Cabrera was able to muster just one home run in 86 plate appearances in the final month of the season. During the ALDS, he was exploited by Athletics pitching, which held him to no more than one hit per game. He hit just one home run and batted .250. In the ALCS, the Red Sox staff limited him to one or fewer hits in five of six games, and let him homer just once. Cabrera hit .273 in the series.

As both the ALCS and NLCS went six games, one has to wonder what kind of an impact a healthy Hanley Ramirez and Miguel Cabrera would have had on their teams’ respective fates. They will, unfortunately, watch the World Series from home as the Red Sox and Cardinals match up in the World Series, starting on Wednesday.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: