Michael Wacha is your NLCS MVP

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Wacha will go home as the MVP of the National League Championship Series, per Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY. The 22-year-old rookie tossed 13.2 shutout innings over two starts against the Dodgers in Games 2 and 6, allowing just seven hits and two walks while striking out 13. Wacha, of course, pitched seven crucial innings in Game 6, the catalyst that sent the Cardinals to the World Series for the second time in three years.

Wacha has been nothing short of phenomenal for the Cardinals since making his Major League debut on May 30. He was their first round pick, going 19th overall in the 2012 draft. The Dodgers, coincidentally enough, picked Corey Seager one slot ahead of Wacha — though they are certainly not disappointed with their selection.

In three post-season starts, Wacha has gone at least six and two-thirds innings, has allowed no more than one run, and allowed five or fewer hits.

According to ESPN Stats & Info, Wacha is the third rookie to win the MVP award in the League Championship Series and is the first since Livan Hernandez in 1997 with the Florida Marlins.

One more:

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.