Has John Farrell learned his lesson now?

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Red Sox manager John Farrell allowed Clay Buchholz to give up five runs to the Tigers in Sunday’s ALCS Game 2, only to be bailed out by one swing from David Ortiz’s bat. On Wednesday, there was no such rescue after Jake Peavy was allowed to surrender seven runs in three-plus innings in what turned out to be a 7-3 loss.

The score suggests the Red Sox never really got back into the game, but things could have turned out a lot differently. Boston ended up outhitting Detroit 12-9. The Red Sox had four extra-base hits to the Tigers’ two (none of the six overall were homers).

What really undid Peavy was the three walks in a span of four batters in the second. The last of those, a four-pitch walk to an ice-cold Austin Jackson, forced in a run. The Red Sox could have minimized the damage from there had Dustin Pedroia not muffed a double-play ball. They didn’t, and Peavy gave up two more hits, making it 5-0. The remaining two runs scored in the fourth.

After Peavy departed, the bullpen, stellar all month to date, combined to throw five scoreless innings. The group has allowed a total of two runs in 24 innings, both of those coming in the lone loss to the Rays in the ALDS.

With ex-starters Felix Doubront and Ryan Dempster, plus another long guy in Brandon Workman, available in the pen, there just wasn’t any reason to stick with Peavy as long as Farrell did. This isn’t the regular season, when a team may play 10 games in 10 days. It’s the postseason: anything goes. Doubront, Dempster and Workman had combined to throw a total of four innings in the past two weeks. They were all ready, and all capable of throwing multiple innings.

Unless it’s Clayton Kershaw or Adam Wainwright we’re dealing with, in the postseason it’s just not worth sticking with a struggling starter in the hopes he’ll turn it around the second or third time through the order. Sure, it can happen, but the relievers are still better bets. If Farrell proves so passive once the ALCS shifts back to Fenway Park, it could cost his team a World Series trip.

Scott Boras to honor request of Kobe Bryant

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John Altobelli was the coach of the Orange Coast College baseball team in Califorinia. He was well known in and around Major League Baseball having worked with and mentored several men who went on to big league careers. There was an excellent profile of him recently at The Athletic.

Altobelli was also a friend of Kobe Bryant’s, and his daughter Alyssa, like Bryant’s daughter Gianna, were members of the Mamba Sports Academy. John and Alyssa Altobelli were, unfortunately, traveling with the Bryants and others to a basketball tournament when their helicopter crashed killing all nine on board.

At Bryant’s memorial service in Los Angeles yesterday, Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka said that he was texting with Bryant minutes before Bryant’s death. During the flight, it seems, Bryant reached out Pelinka to see whether he knew “a certain baseball agent in Southern California,” because he wanted help Altobelli’s other daughter, sixteen-year-old Lexi, find an internship with one.

Today the Los Angeles Times reports that that “certain baseball agent” was Scott Boras and that, yes, he has stepped in to offer Lexi Altobelli an internship. Lexi Altobelli will rotate through marketing, baseball operations, sports science and office administration among other areas of Boras Corp.

Nice move, Scott.