Chris Carpenter “will retire” this offseason

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From Nick Cafardo’s always-information-packed Sunday notes column in the Boston Globe:

Chris Carpenter’s agent, Bob LaMonte, said the righthander will retire and “may have an opportunity to work for the Cardinals organization. Chris basically came back from five career-ending surgeries. I don’t think you’ll ever see anyone do that again. He had a sixth and it was too many. He had a great career, a great human being.”

Carpenter, 38, will finish his 15-year major league career with a 3.76 ERA (116 ERA+) in 2,219 1/3 innings. A fiery competitor, he won the National League Cy Young Award in 2005 and earned World Series rings in both 2006 and 2011. He can also pick up another one this year if the Cardinals advance past the Dodgers in the NLCS and beat the winner of the ALCS.

Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak said this weekend that the door is open for Carpenter to take on a role in the St. Louis front office. Carpenter has not spoken publicly about his retirement plans.

The native of Manchester, New Hampshire made a total of $98,592,956 in his big league career.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?