The qualifying offer is up to $14.1 million this winter

3 Comments

If a team gives a departing free agent a “qualifying offer,” the team that ultimately signs the free agent loses a first or second round pick. The draft pick component of it all can depress the value of a free agent on the market who rejects said offer. Just ask Kyle Lohse how that worked out for him last year. Of course the free agent can simply take the qualifying offer. It’s a gamble all around, then. The team extending it is betting that the player is worth the amount of the qualifying offer, the player bets that he can do better and the team signing him bets a first or second round draft pick on the guy.

The qualifying offer is arrived at by taking an average of the top 125 salaries in baseball. Last year it was $13.3 million. Joel Sherman reports today that it has gone up, as expected. Up a little higher than some guessed, however: it’s now $14.1 million.

So, this winter, when you hear about so-and-so accepting or rejecting the qualifying offer, the amount in play is that $14.1 million.

 

source:

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

Tim Warner/Getty Images
4 Comments

Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.