“The Dodgers are leaning toward bringing back Mattingly”

29 Comments

Kind of a weird way to put it given that he’s about to manage his team in the NLCS, but the fact of the matter, as Dylan Hernandez reports, is that the Dodgers have not resolved Don Mattingly’s contract situation yet. And don’t plan to until after the playoffs.

Mattingly — who was this close [I am holding my fingers together very closely] from being fired back in June — has an option for next year. But you have to figure he wants a long term deal now, not a year in lame duck status at a first-time manager’s salary.

All of that aside, I wouldn’t put too much into the Dodgers not extending him yet. This is sort of the Yankees’ m.o., isn’t it? Do all of that business after the season is over rather than give some extension while everyone is all happy with success. Maybe it makes for some awkward moments, but if you set a precedent as an organization that that’s how you do things, you get fewer questions about it down the road.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
3 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.