George Steinbrenner wouldn’t get the Yankees under $189 million? Really?

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The Yankees are expected to get their payroll under $189 million for 2014. A decision borne of a desire to avoid the luxury tax, which could cost them some $100 million over the next two years.

Joel Sherman of the New York Post talks to Hal Steinbrenner about all of this. It’s a good interview, but I find the assumption Sherman has going into it — that Big George would never lower the payroll to avoid the luxury tax — to be something less than reasonable:

… no current issue brings out George-channeling psychics quite like the organizational plans to drop under the $189 million luxury tax threshold in 2014. No way The Boss would do that. He would do whatever was necessary to win a title — damn financial common sense.

I’m not so sure. George Steinbrenner was a lot of things, but a dumb businessman was not one of them. He turned a small investment — with a lot of other people’s money — into a franchise worth more than a billion dollars. During the years he was running the team actively he never had to face the severe luxury tax implications the Yankees face next year if they don’t get under $189 million. I don’t think it’s at all reasonable to say that George would act differently.

But we live in a world where everything is seen through George-colored glasses when it comes to the Yankees. So people will continue to say that, I suppose.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.