Dusty Baker reached out to the Nationals about their job opening

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With Joe Girardi staying in New York, the other managerial job openings move to the fore. Hard to say who goes where — I’m personally anticipating a Jim Riggleman bidding war between the Reds, Cubs and Nats, none of which can quit him — but at least one guy has an idea of where he wants to go. From Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post:

Longtime manager Dusty Baker, whom the Reds fired late last week, contacted General Manager Mike Rizzo through his agent to inform the Nationals he is interested in the job. Baker said no interview has been schedule, and it is not clear if the Nationals have reciprocal interest in him.

Baker confirmed to Kilgore that he reached out and is interested.

Man, I dunno. One of the things that seems kinda clear from Washington is that Mike Rizzo really had his fill of a well-established veteran manager who cuts a large figure in the media. No, Dusty isn’t Davey Johnson, but the idea that the reporters are going to come by every day to hear what he has to say rather than report the Nationals company line is the kind of dynamic one gets the sense that Rizzo wants to move away from. Better to get more of a company man like a Randy Knorr or a less-experienced guy like Matt Williams who won’t upstage the front office.

I obviously could be wrong about that. It’s just a vibe I get from reading all manner of stories about Rizzo, Johnson and the Nats. Either way, I’d be kind of surprised if they went after Dusty Baker.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.