The A’s use longball en route to 6-3 win, lead series 2-1

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The Tigers’ backs are up against the wall. They fell to the A’s 6-3 this afternoon, and now find themselves in a 2-1 hole in their best of five series vs. Oakland.

A team with a reputation for bashing the ball had to scratch and claw for runs the past two games and, with the exception of a three-run fourth inning, could never get on track again today. Those runs were their first in 20 innings, but that’s all they could get off Jarrod Parker and Detroit followed up that moderate outburst with five more goose eggs.

Meanwhile, the A.L. ERA leader, Anibal Sanchez, was touched for six runs — five earned — while allowing three home runs in four and a third. Brandon Moss, Seth Smith and Josh Reddick went deep for the A’s. Additional runs came on a Miguel Cabrera error in the third and a Coco Crisp sac fly in the fourth.

There will likely be some nervous Tigers fans suggesting that Max Scherzer get the call on short rest for tomorrow’s Game Four. But that seems like a pipe dream. Scherzer is not that kind of horse — he’s never even pitched a complete game — so it’ll be up to Doug Fister to save the Tigers season tomorrow.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.