The Marlon Byrd trade has worked out well for the Pirates

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If you had Marlon Byrd as a trade acquisition making the biggest impact in the post-season, please step forward to claim your prize. Everything about the 35-year-old’s 2013 season has been unlikely, from the 21 home runs and .848 OPS he posted in five months with the Mets, to the three homers and .843 OPS he compiled in a month-plus with the Pirates, to the second-inning home run he hit to stake the Pirates to a 1-0 lead in the Wild Card game against the Reds, to tonight’s outstanding performance in Game 3 of the NLDS against the Cardinals.

The Pirates picked up Byrd (and John Buck) from the Mets on August 27 for Minor Leaguers Dilson Herrera and Vic Black. At the time, the Pirates were still in a knock-down, drag-out fight in the NL Central with the Cardinals and Reds, and Byrd was as good an upgrade as was available at the time. Like most moves GM Neal Huntington has made to put together the current iteration of the Pirates roster, this move has been a boon to the club.

Byrd went 2-for-3 with a two-run single in the first, a double in the sixth that helped move Andrew McCutchen to third base (he would subsequently score), and a walk in the eighth inning to set the stage for Pedro Alvarez, who would knock in the game-winning run with a single to right. Byrd was the catalyst for the Pirates, involved in every meaningful run they scored tonight, defeating the Cardinals by a 5-3 margin.

If the Pirates are able to advance to the NLCS, whether tomorrow at home or on Wednesday in St. Louis, they will have many players to thank, but Byrd will certainly be at the top of the list. Who knew a 35-year-old journeyman outfielder with a career .749 OPS would be such an important contributor in the post-season?

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.