Yoenis Cespedes gets no help in Oakland’s Game 1 loss

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A triple and a two-run homer from Yoenis Cespedes simply wasn’t enough for the A’s Friday as the Tigers took Game 1 of the ALDS 3-2.

Cespedes was responsible for two-thirds of Oakland’s hits in the game. The other was a little infield single from Brandon Moss in the seventh. Immediately after that was when Cespedes hit his bomb off Max Scherzer. It was the only time Cespedes got to hit with a man on.

Besides Moss and Cespedes, the only Athletic to reach base safely was Coco Crisp. He did so three times via the walk. The A’s struck out 16 times, with Cespedes contributing two of those himself.

The no-name bottom of the order of Stephen Vogt, Daric Barton and Eric Sogard couldn’t get anything going, finishing 0-for-8. Barton, in there partly for his defense, had a misplay that contributed to the three-run first off Bartolo Colon and ended up striking out in all three of his at-bats. He may well take a seat on Saturday, with Moss moving back to first and possibly Seth Smith getting the nod at DH.

Scherzer allowed a total of 16 extra-base hits to right-handed hitters this year, making Cespedes’ showing especially impressive. It was the first time this year that Scherzer had given up a homer and another extra-base hit to a batter in the same game. The only two to have to extra-base hits off him were Nick Swisher (double, triple on May 10) and Asdrubal Cabrera (two doubles on Aug. 8).

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.