Behind David Ortiz’s two-homer night, Red Sox take a 2-0 lead in the ALDS

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The Red Sox will head down to Tampa Bay happy campers. After a thorough 12-2 dismantling of the Rays in Game 1, the Sox scored seven runs against 2012 AL Cy Young award winner David Price in seven-plus innings, just enough run support for John Lackey.

The scoring started early, with Jacoby Ellsbury leading off the game with a single, stealing second base and forcing a throwing error to advance to third base, then scoring on Dustin Pedroia’s sacrifice fly. David Ortiz added a well-struck home run to right-center to make it 2-0.

After the Rays clawed back for a run in the top of the second on a Delmon Young sac fly, the Sox scored another two runs in the bottom of the third on a double by Jacoby Ellsbury and an RBI fielder’s choice by Pedroia. The Sox would make it 5-1 in the fourth on an RBI triple by Stephen Drew.

The Rays did a good job against Lackey, tagging him for seven hits and three walks. James Loney struck a big blow in the fifth, driving a two-run double to center to make it 5-3. With Loney on second, the Rays had two opportunities to draw closer or even tie the game, but after Evan Longoria walked, Ben Zobrist struck out to end the rally.

As quickly as the Rays got those two runs, the Red Sox took one back. Ellsbury led off the inning with a single, then used his speed to score from first on a Pedroia double off the Green Monster.

Lackey took the hill for the sixth, but the Rays chased him quickly. Desmond Jennings led off the inning with a single, then advanced to second on Young’s ground out. He came around to score from second on an RBI single to right by Yunel Escobar. Rays manager Joe Maddon then pinch-hit catcher Jose Molina with the left-handed Matt Joyce, prompting Red Sox manager John Farrell to take out Lackey in favor of lefty reliever Craig Breslow. Breslow retired Joyce and then Sean Rodriguez to exit the inning without any further damage. Breslow also pitched a scoreless seventh in support of Lackey. Junichi Tazawa worked around a one-out single by Young in the eighth.

In the bottom of the eighth, Ortiz struck again, leading off the inning with a home run to right field that wrapped around Pesky’s Pole for his second home run of the night. Prior to Ortiz, the last Red Sox hitter to homer twice in a post-season game was Pedroia in Game 2 of the ALCS against the Rays in 2008.

Closer Koji Uehara disposed of the Rays quickly in the ninth, striking out Joyce and Jose Lobaton, then getting Wil Myers to ground out to first to make the 7-4 Sox victory official. He threw 11 pitches, all of them strikes. Now up 2-0 in the ALDS, the two teams will head down to Tampa for Game 3 on Monday. Red Sox starter Clay Buchholz will oppose Rays starter Alex Cobb.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.