ALDS Game 2: Rays-Red Sox lineups

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Rays and Red Sox lineups for Game 2 of the ALDS, at Fenway Park. First pitch is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. ET …

Rays:
LF David DeJesus
RF Wil Myers
1B James Loney
3B Evan Longoria
2B Ben Zobrist
CF Desmond Jennings
DH Delmon Young
SS Yunel Escobar
C Jose Molina

SP David Price

Joe Maddon’s lineup is similar to what we speculated this morning, as David DeJesus is playing left field and batting leadoff while Sean Rodriguez is on the bench. Meanwhile, Jose Molina is starting behind the plate over Jose Lobaton with Price on the mound. Everybody else is the same as Game 1, though Evan Longoria is the only one who is in the same spot in the lineup. It looks like Delmon Young has taken over as the regular DH, at least for now.

Red Sox:
CF Jacoby Ellsbury
RF Shane Victorino
2B Dustin Pedroia
DH David Ortiz
1B Mike Napoli
LF Jonny Gomes
3B Will Middlebrooks
SS Stephen Drew
C David Ross

SP John Lackey

As expected, Ross is catching Lackey rather than Jarrod Saltalamacchia. It makes sense with another left-hander going for the Rays. And while we’re talking about a small sample, Ross has homered in each game he has started against Price in each of the last two seasons. Red Sox manager John Farrell cited Ross’ rapport with Lackey when talking to Scott Lauber of the Boston Herald today, though he has only caught him twice this year. While Will Middlebrooks batted ninth in Game 1, he’ll hit seventh today. Otherwise, everything is the same as yesterday.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.