Rays blank Indians in American League Wild Card Game

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It’s rare that a team will tally nine hits and be held scoreless, but that is exactly what happened to the host Indians in Wednesday night’s American League Wild Card Game at Progressive Field in Cleveland.

Using an arsenal of vicious breaking stuff and a steady low-90s fastball, Rays starter Alex Cobb worked in and out of trouble for 6 2/3 shutout frames as Tampa Bay grabbed a 4-0 victory over the Tribe to advance to an ALDS meeting with the American League East-champion Red Sox. Tampa Bay’s bullpen looked like a potential weak spot heading into this one-game coin-flip, but right-hander Joel Peralta and left-hander Jake McGee were sharp in setup duty and Rays closer Fernando Rodney shot his arrows after a clean bottom of the ninth.

The Rays got their first run in the third on a Delmon Young solo shot after two dominant opening innings from Indians starter Danny Salazar, who was pumping 98-mph fastballs with ease until he was lifted in the top of the fifth. Salazar’s impressive velocity readings gave the home fans something to look forward to in 2014, but the 23-year-old right-hander wound up surrendering three runs on four hits and two walks in the loss.

The Rays added a fourth insurance run against the Cleveland bullpen in the top of the ninth inning.

Rays manager Joe Maddon will lead his team into Fenway Park this weekend for the opening games of a big best-of-five series between two very-familiar American League East foes. Game 1 is Friday at 3 p.m. ET.

Aaron Hicks would like to avoid Tommy John surgery

Aaron Hicks
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The Yankees’ 2019 run ended in heartbreak on Saturday night when, despite a stunning ninth-inning comeback, they fell 6-4 to the Astros and officially lost their bid for the AL pennant. Now, facing a long offseason, there are a few decisions to be made.

One of those falls on the shoulders of outfielder Aaron Hicks, who told reporters that he “thinks he can continue playing without Tommy John surgery.” It’s unclear whose recommendation he’s basing that decision on, however, as MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch points out that Tommy John surgery was recommended during the slugger’s most recent meeting with Dr. Neal ELAttrache.

Hicks originally sustained a season-ending right flexor strain in early August and held several consultations with ElAttrache and the Yankees’ physician in the months that followed. He spent two and a half months on the 60-day injured list and finally returned to the Yankees’ roster during the ALCS, in which he went 2-for-13 with a base hit and a Game 5 three-run homer against the Astros.

Of course, a handful of strong performances doesn’t definitively prove that the outfielder is fully healed — or that he’ll be able to avoid aggravating the injury with further activity. Granted, Tommy John surgery isn’t a minor procedure; it’s one that requires up to a year of rest and rehabilitation before most players are cleared to throw again. Should Hicks wait to reverse his decision until he reports for spring training in 2020, though, it could push his return date out by another six months or so.