Lawsuit filed claiming that the idea for “Trouble with the Curve” was stolen

44 Comments

I think “Trouble with the Curve” was kind of a bad movie. As a general interest movie it was a cliched aging father/misunderstood daughter thing and its portrayal of the baseball world is just terrible. Really, the bad guy — the Billy Zabka character — is a paper thin caricature of a stats-oriented analyst that even the most ardent “Moneyball” hater would laugh at as too obvious.

But even if it’s bad, the movie did make $35 million at the box office and is no doubt being rented (on VHS maybe) by a lot of older folks who like to see youngsters put in their place. So there’s value there. And, according to one man, that value was stolen from him. Via Variety:

A college baseball player turned filmmaker has filed suit against Warner Bros., the Gersh Agency, United Talent Agency, Malpaso Prods., screenwriter Don Handfield and director Robert Lorenz and several others, alleging that Warner Bros.’ “Trouble With the Curve” was lifted from the scripts and concept reel of one of his passion projects, “Omaha.”

There is no comment from the credited writer or the studio, but the plaintiff’s allegations are fairly specific and, at first blush, more than a little compelling.

Interesting.

Report: Six teams are in on Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki
Getty Images
2 Comments

At least six teams are interested in free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, according to a recent report from Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Known suitors include the Cubs, who will reportedly be in attendance during one of the shortstop’s offseason workouts as they decide whether or not to press forward with a deal.

The Blue Jays released Tulowitzki on Tuesday as general manager Ross Atkins admitted he couldn’t rely on the 34-year-old to bounce back from season-ending bone spur removal surgery and be the kind of consistent presence the club needed going forward. Toronto is expected to absorb the remaining $38 million on Tulowitzki’s contract, which includes the $20 million he’s due in 2019, another $14 million in 2020 and a $4 million buyout in 2021.

The veteran slugger will be available to any interested team at a minimum $600,000, an undeniably attractive bargain if he recovers in advance of the 2019 season. He last appeared in the majors in 2017 and slashed .249/.300/.378 with 17 extra-base hits and a .678 OPS through 260 PA. Per Slusser, Tulowitzki appears to be angling for a job with the Athletics — even going so far as to say he’d be willing to switch positions in order to play for a winning team — though they have yet to reach out about a potential deal this winter.