When the standouts don’t stand out

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Obviously, offense in the year 2013 isn’t what it used to be.

Arizona’s Paul Goldschmidt led the National League this year with a .954 OPS and was tied with Pedro Alvarez for first with 36 homers. It’s hardly a knock against him to say that those aren’t the totals we’re used to seeing leading the league.

Goldschmidt’s OPS was the lowest for a first-place finisher in either circuit since 1991, when Barry Bonds topped the NL at .924. The 36 homers is the lowest total to lead a league since the Padres’ Fred McGriff hit 35 in 1992.

Miguel Cabrera led the AL with 37 homers in 2008 and there were a couple other sub-40 leaders since, so it’s not completely shocking to see the 36 homers pacing the NL. Still, it is pretty stunning that just three got to 30 in all. Jay Bruce was third with exactly 30. Domonic Brown, Hunter Pence and Justin Upton all tied for fourth at 27.

Compare that to 2001. The homer totals from Goldschmidt and Alvarez would have tied for 14th in the NL that year.  When Moises Alou, J.D. Drew and Pat Burrell hit 27 homers that year, they tied for 27th in the league, a far cry from fourth.

The AL did quite a bit better in the power department, with Chris Davis’s 53 homers leading the way. Nine American Leaguers hit 30 homers. Only eight got to 100 RBI, though, and a mere four scored 100 runs, led by Mike Trout’s 109. In 1999, 30 American Leaguers drove in 100 runs and 28 scored 100 runs. Trout’s run total was the lowest to lead the AL in a non-strike year since 1976.

Report: Angels to sign Cody Allen

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Angels and reliever Cody Allen are in agreement on a one-year contract, pending a physical. The value of the contract is not yet known.

Allen, 30, was looking for an opportunity to close and the Angels can certainly provide that. He will likely be the favorite to break camp as the closer. 2018 was the roughest year of his career, however, as he finished with a 4.70 ERA, 27 saves, and a 80/33 K/BB ratio in 67 innings. Among Allen’s six full seasons, his 27.7 strikeout rate and 11.4 percent walk rate represented career-worsts. FanGraphs also shows him losing nearly a full MPH on his average fastball velocity.

The Angels lost closer Keynan Middleton to Tommy John surgery early last season and he likely won’t return until the second half of the 2019 season. Blake Parker, who handled save situations in Middleton’s place, was non-tendered by the Angels in November and ended up signing with the Twins. The closer’s role is Allen’s to lose, it seems.