Looking ahead to Game 163

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And you thought we’d have no baseball today. What a bonus for everyone who isn’t a Rangers and Rays fan. Rangers and Rays fans get heartburn to go along with it, and one of those fan bases will go to bed sad, so it’s something of a mixed bag.

But what we all get is David Price vs. Martin Perez. Which, on the surface seems like a bit of mismatch given that Price is the reigning AL Cy Young Award winner and Perez has 25 starts to his name. Perez, however, is 7-2 in last ten starts with 3.26 ERA while Price has struggled mightily against the Rangers. In eight starts against Texas he’s 1-4 with a 5.98 ERA. In Arlington — where he pitches tonight — his ERA is 10.26.

Also worth watching: Nelson Cruz, who returns to action for the Rangers following his 50-game suspension in the Biogenesis scandal. Cruz has had a lot of success against Price — 9 for 23 with three homers — and if he comes up big tonight you can expect a lot of people to ask whether it was appropriate for him to be eligible. Of course, people asking that will be ignorant of how 50-game suspensions actually work — Cruz has served his time so of course he should be eligible — but that sort of logic tends not to stop people from going crazy anyway.

So here it is, bonus baseball! One more winner-take-all affair. Grab your Alka-Seltzer, Rays and Rangers fans. Grab your popcorn everyone else

The Royals are paying everyone. Why can’t all of the other teams?

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Over the past several weeks we’ve heard a lot of news about teams furloughing front office and scouting staff, leveling pay cuts for those who remain and, most recently, ceasing stipends to minor league players and releasing them en masse. The message being sent, intentionally or otherwise, is that baseball teams are feeling the pinch.

The Kansas City Royals, however, are a different story.

Jon Heyman reported this afternoon that the Royals are paying their minor leaguers through August 31, which is when the minor league season would’ve ended, and unlike so many other teams, they are not releasing players either. Jeff Passan, meanwhile, reports that the Royals will not lay any team employees off or furlough anyone. “Nearly 150 employees will not take pay cuts,” he says, though “higher-level employees will take tiered cuts.” Passan adds that the organization intends to restore the lost pay due to those higher-level employees in the future when revenue ramps back up, making them whole.

While baseball finances are murky at best and opaque in most instances, most people agree that the Royals are one of the lower-revenue franchises in the game. They are also near the bottom as far as franchise value goes. Finally, they have the newest ownership group in all of baseball, which means that the group almost certainly has a lot of debt and very little if any equity in the franchise. Any way you slice it, cashflow is likely tighter in Kansas City than almost anywhere else.

Yet the Royals are paying minor leaguers and front office employees while a great number of other teams are not. What’s their excuse?