Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Clay Buchholz had his longest outing since coming off the disabled list while David Ortiz joined some special company as the Red Sox hammered the Orioles 12-3 last night at Camden Yards. In doing so, John Farrell’s club is one step closer to clinching the best record in the American League.

While Buchholz didn’t have his best stuff, he held the Orioles to three runs over seven innings. He threw 113 pitches in the victory, his second-highest total of the season. He’ll finish the regular season at 12-1 with a 1.74 ERA over 16 starts. With his neck and shoulder issues in the past, the Red Sox have to feel pretty good about him going into the postseason.

David Ortiz, Daniel Nava, and Jonny Gomes all homered in the victory. For Ortiz, he now has his seventh career 30-homer, 100-RBI season. That ties him with Ted Williams for the club record.

With a 97-63 record, the Red Sox have at least clinched a tie for the best record in the AL. The Athletics currently sit at 95-65 with two games to go.

Your Friday box scores:

Red Sox 12, Orioles 3

Pirates 4, Reds 1

Brewers 4, Mets 2

Rays 3, Blue Jays 6

Tigers 2, Marlins 3

Angels 3, Rangers 5

Royals 6, White Sox 1

Phillies 0, Braves 1

Indians 12, Twins 6

Cubs 0, Cardinals 7

Yankees 3, Astros 2

Nationals 8, Diamondbacks 4

Athletics 8, Mariners 2

Rockies 0, Dodgers 11

Padres 3, Giants 7

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.