Jesus hits cleanup for the Nationals

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That’s the actual headline from this Washington Times story about the Nats and religion:

But this year, perhaps more than in years past, religion has become a frequent topic inside the Nationals’ clubhouse. Players of differing beliefs discuss them, sometimes turning into hotly contested debates. Multiple players, regardless of whether they were actively religious or not, said they never had been on a team that talks about religion as much as this one.

“People always say, ‘When you’re with strangers you don’t talk about politics, you don’t talk about religion,’” Stammen said. “But we’ve all become good enough friends that I don’t think we judge each other too much. We can talk about it a little bit. And there’s guys who are very interested and inquisitive, because they don’t know much about it.”

Ballplayers are, on the whole, a pretty religious bunch. Demographics play into that, as there is a huge overlap between people from rural areas, the south, Latinos and religious identification.  Every clubhouse has a chapel service and a core of players one could call the religious caucus. And, for the most part, it’s never a big deal. You hear random stories about guys like Chad Curtis making waves in the clubhouse due to their zealotry, but when you look at what else defines Chad Curtis, you’d be hard-pressed to say that his problems were borne of a particularly religious disposition. He’s just a total jerk.

Beyond that stuff I’ve always been impressed at how seamlessly baseball clubhouses blend together people from different religions and cultures and attitudes. Especially given how much time these guys have to spend together in fairly close quarters. It’s amazing we don’t hear more about rifts and personality clashes than we do.

A.J. Hinch responds to Ken Giles’ negative comments about Astros

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On Sunday, Blue Jays closer Ken Giles spoke to Rosie DiManno of the Toronto Star. Giles said, “I’m actually enjoying the game more than I did for my entire tenure in Houston.” Giles won a World Series with the Astros last year, but talked about communication issues with the Astros and compared them unfavorably to the Blue Jays. Giles described the communication as having been “lost” and credited the Jays for staying patient with him.

Astros manager A.J. Hinch responded to Giles’ comments on Monday. Per Sportsnet’s Shi Davidi, Hinch said:

I think he’s wrong and I’m disappointed that he would go down that path given how much work and time and energy and communication that our front office, our coaching staff, me, we all went through this with him. And I understand, there was some disappointment in his tenure as an Astro because of the turbulent way things went about. We gave him every opportunity, we communicated with him effectively, we have an incredible culture where every single player will tell you it’s one of the best cultures they’ve had, one of the best communication envrionments they’ve had. They all know their roles. They all know their situations. To have one person out of all the guys in our clubhouse come out and claim otherwise is flat wrong.

While Giles certainly could be embellishing or deliberately misconstruing his time there, Hinch’s rebuttal doesn’t actually disqualify anything Giles said. Giles certainly could have had a negative experience in Houston even if everyone else was enjoying the “incredible culture” and “one of the best communication environments.”

Given how the Astros — including Hinch — responded to criticism about their acquiring an accused domestic abuser, they’re not in the best position to boast about an “incredible culture” anyway.

At any rate, this is a he-said, he-said situation. If anything more comes of it, it will be Giles further torching a bridge.