Robinson Cano reportedly seeking a $305 million contract. Um, OK.

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Not $300M. It has to be $305M because, I dunno, taxes maybe. Yeah, let’s go with taxes:

 

Folks: it’s going to be silly season soon. Misinformation, both accidental and tactically-placed misinformation, is going to reign supreme when it comes to Cano’s free agency. There are too many reporters and too many leakers covering it and everyone has an incentive to frame the narrative which surrounds it all.

For example: if you’re the Yankees and you don’t think you can or will sign Cano, you’re going to want to make it seem like he’s unreasonable so you don’t come off as cheap. At the same time, if your’e Cano’s people you’re going to have your own agenda and we’ll likely see a lot of that kind of spin too.Not saying that’s what this is — who knows? — but that dynamic always seems to happen with the big stars.

But just look back to the past few years and remember how silly things get reported about big free agents and then remember how, for the most part, sanity comes back to the fore. Then chuckle these things off.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.