Robinson Cano reportedly seeking a $305 million contract. Um, OK.

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Not $300M. It has to be $305M because, I dunno, taxes maybe. Yeah, let’s go with taxes:

 

Folks: it’s going to be silly season soon. Misinformation, both accidental and tactically-placed misinformation, is going to reign supreme when it comes to Cano’s free agency. There are too many reporters and too many leakers covering it and everyone has an incentive to frame the narrative which surrounds it all.

For example: if you’re the Yankees and you don’t think you can or will sign Cano, you’re going to want to make it seem like he’s unreasonable so you don’t come off as cheap. At the same time, if your’e Cano’s people you’re going to have your own agenda and we’ll likely see a lot of that kind of spin too.Not saying that’s what this is — who knows? — but that dynamic always seems to happen with the big stars.

But just look back to the past few years and remember how silly things get reported about big free agents and then remember how, for the most part, sanity comes back to the fore. Then chuckle these things off.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.