Johnny Hellweg posts worst K/BB ratio in over 30 years

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Brewers right-hander Johnny Hellweg actually finished his season on a high note Thursday against the Mets. Despite throwing just 37 of his 80 pitches for strikes, he allowed only one run in four innings. Plus, he actually managed three strikeouts to go along with his four walks, improving his K/BB ratio from 6/22 to 9/26.

Too bad that 9/26 mark is still the worst by any pitcher, min. 30 innings, in over 30 years.

The last to go over Hellweg’s 2.89 walks for every strikeout was Oakland’s Mike Morgan in 1979. Morgan, pitching in the majors at the tender age of 19, posted a 17/50 K/BB ratio in 77 1/3 innings that year.

Before that, the Pirates’ Steve Blass had an 27/84 K/BB ratio in 88 2/3 innings in 1973. His sudden inability to throw the ball over the plate resulted in a “disease” being named after him.

Hellweg probably won’t emulate either Morgan or Blass going forward. Morgan ended up pitching in the majors until age 42 and setting a record by playing for 12 teams (later broken by Matt Stairs). Blass, on the other hand, made just one more appearance after 1973, walking seven in five innings. He later found a home in the Pirates’ broadcast booth.

The 24-year-old Hellweg never even should have been brought to the majors this year after he walked 81 and hit 14 batters in 125 2/3 innings in Triple-A, though he was 12-5 with a 3.15 ERA even with all of the wildness. Both the Angels and Brewers have tried tightening up his mechanics with limited success. He does have the arm to be of use as a third starter or a late-game reliever if he ever figures it out, but the Brewers risked injury to to every hitter he faced when they put him on the mound this season.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.