Carlos Gomez homers, gets ejected, never touches home plate

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The fireworks started early at the Brewers-Braves game in Atlanta on Wednesday, with a Carlos Gomez homer off Paul Maholm in the top of the first leading to a benches-clearing incident.

Gomez and Maholm had a history, with Gomez batting .424 with two HBPs in 21 career plate appearances against the lefty. After his long homer tonight, he paused and watched, then started jawing with Maholm as he finally decided to start his trot. The conversation continued with Freddie Freeman as he rounded first, and as he turned third, he found himself a roadblock in the form of Brian McCann about 15 feet in front of home plate.

That went as well as one might expect. Gomez and McCann traded barbs and were quickly joined by a couple of Brewers and Reed Johnson off the Braves’ bench. Gomez got very angry, but he seemed more interested in finding teammates to hold him back than actually taking a swing at anyone. In the end, no blows were exchanged. Freeman was the Brave ejected, to his great surprise. The Gomez ejection went unannounced, but he didn’t take his position in the bottom of the first.

Oddly enough, Gomez never did come around to touch home plate. Since McCann obstructed him, it seems he didn’t have to.

For McCann and the Braves, it’s the second incident in a couple of weeks in which they didn’t much like someone’s actions after homering off them. The Marlins’ Jose Fernandez previously got into it with McCann and Chris Johnson.

Whether McCann started this one or not, he should have been the Brave ejected for getting in Gomez’s way. It was hard to see what Freeman did beyond some verbal jousting.

MLB and MLBPA announce first set of COVID-19 test results

MLB COVID-19 test results
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images
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On Friday evening, Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association announced the first set of results for COVID-19 testing as part of the mandatory intake screening process under MLB’s COVID-19 Health Monitoring & Testing Plan. Per Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle, the Athletics are not part of this data because their testing has not yet been completed.

There were 38 positive tests, accounting for 1.2% of the 3,185 samples collected and tested. 31 of the 38 individuals who tested positive are players. 19 different teams had one or more individuals test positive.

Sports Illustrated’s Emma Baccellieri notes that the positive test rate in the U.S. nationally is 8.3 percent. The NBA’s positive test rate was 7.1 percent. MLB’s positive test rate is well below average. This doesn’t necessarily mean that anything is wrong with MLB’s testing or that it’s an atypical round of testing. Rather, MLB’s testing population may more closely represent the U.S. population as a whole. Currently, because testing is still somewhat limited, those who have taken tests have tended to be those exhibiting symptoms or those who have been around others who have tested positive. If every single person in the U.S. took a test, the positive test rate would likely come in at a much lower number.

Several players who tested positive have given their consent for their identities to be made known. Those are: Delino DeShields (link), Brett Martin (link), Edward Colina, Nick Gordon, and Willians Astudillo (link). Additionally, Red Sox lefty Eduardo Rodríguez has not shown up to Red Sox camp yet because he has been around someone who tested positive, per The Athletic’s Jen McCaffrey.