Carlos Gomez homers, gets ejected, never touches home plate

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The fireworks started early at the Brewers-Braves game in Atlanta on Wednesday, with a Carlos Gomez homer off Paul Maholm in the top of the first leading to a benches-clearing incident.

Gomez and Maholm had a history, with Gomez batting .424 with two HBPs in 21 career plate appearances against the lefty. After his long homer tonight, he paused and watched, then started jawing with Maholm as he finally decided to start his trot. The conversation continued with Freddie Freeman as he rounded first, and as he turned third, he found himself a roadblock in the form of Brian McCann about 15 feet in front of home plate.

That went as well as one might expect. Gomez and McCann traded barbs and were quickly joined by a couple of Brewers and Reed Johnson off the Braves’ bench. Gomez got very angry, but he seemed more interested in finding teammates to hold him back than actually taking a swing at anyone. In the end, no blows were exchanged. Freeman was the Brave ejected, to his great surprise. The Gomez ejection went unannounced, but he didn’t take his position in the bottom of the first.

Oddly enough, Gomez never did come around to touch home plate. Since McCann obstructed him, it seems he didn’t have to.

For McCann and the Braves, it’s the second incident in a couple of weeks in which they didn’t much like someone’s actions after homering off them. The Marlins’ Jose Fernandez previously got into it with McCann and Chris Johnson.

Whether McCann started this one or not, he should have been the Brave ejected for getting in Gomez’s way. It was hard to see what Freeman did beyond some verbal jousting.

Scott Boras: Conflict of interest for agent to become GM

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Earlier, Craig wrote about the latest in the Mets’ search for a new general manager. Their list has been pared down to three candidates: Chaim Bloom (Rays senior VP of baseball operations), Doug Melvin (Brewers senior advisor), and agent Brodie Van Wagenen (of Creative Artists Agency).

It’s a diverse list, for sure, which makes one wonder what process allowed them to arrive at these final three candidates. Bloom is new school, Melvin is older-school, and Van Wagenen is… just inexperienced. Van Wagenen in particular is an interesting candidate as he has spent years advocating on his clients’ behalf. As a GM, he would do the exact opposite: he would try to take advantage of his players whenever possible, like every other GM in baseball does (e.g. manipulating service time).

Per Mike Puma of the New York Post, agent Scott Boras thinks there would be a conflict of interest if an agent were to become a GM. Boras, in fact, says he has turned down opportunities to lead front offices. But there is no verbiage saying that an agent must divest himself of his business interests before taking a job in a front office. Dave Stewart and Jeff Moorad are two examples of agents who later went onto the ownership side of the business. Stewart, in fact, moved into the front office after retiring and held various roles in with various organizations until he started Sports Management Partners (renamed Stewart Management Partners). He transferred control of the agency to Dave Henderson before he joined the Diamondbacks’ front office near the end of the 2014 season.

Ownership and labor are in constant conflict, even when things seem peaceful. Ownership wants to extract as much labor as possible as cheaply as possible. Labor wants to be paid for their work as much as possible. Their goals contradict each other and yet they need each other. While not required, usually being deeply on one side or the other — as agents and GM’s are — speaks to one’s personal ethos about the eternal tug-of-war. That Van Wagenen is so eager to switch sides speaks, perhaps, to opportunism. I would be, at minimum, unsettled if I were a client of Wan Wagenen’s at CAA. How might he use the sensitive information he was privy to as an agent to his advantage as a GM?

We have seen the analytics wave take over front offices around baseball. As ownership looks for ever more ways to pocket more cash, Van Wagenen’s candidacy may signal an upcoming wave of agents transitioning into front office roles. Hopefully that doesn’t become the case. There may be no one better equipped to take advantage of labor than someone experienced on that side of the battlefield.