The best defense Alex Rodriguez can buy

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Alex Rodriguez’s appeal is slated to begin on Monday in New York. Today the New York Times has a rundown of his legal and P.R. team. This quote sums it up pretty well:

“Everyone has a right to the best defense money can buy, and Alex Rodriguez has got a lot of money, so he’s bought a lot of defense”

Someone is quoted in the article speculating that he’s paying six figures a month to keep the team running, which sounds about right. A huge portion of that is probably coming from the civil litigation team he has on standby. Based on my personal experience with high profile two-track cases (i.e. a criminal and civil component or an employment/civil component) there is a team of associates billing the hell out of research projects in support of all manner of lawsuits that could possibly be filed but which never will be. When they go out for beers after work, coworkers not on the A-Rod case say things like “man, I wish I was on the A-Rod case; I may fall short of my billable requirement this year and I could use the hours.”

But such is life in this world.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.