Some Dodgers may have peed in the Chase Field pool during their celebration

84 Comments

Well, this certainly puts a new spin on the Dodgers-Dbacks rivalry, Swimming Pool-Gate and all of that. Anthony Jackson reports that maybe it was more than just fun and games going on at Chase Field on Thursday night:

. . . it has come to my attention that one of the Dodgers players who jumped in the pool — and I will do him the favor of leaving his name out of this for now — openly and loudly bragged after leaving the pool about having urinated in it … There also are indications that MULTIPLE Dodgers players urinated into the pool, but I can’t tell you that with any certainty. It’s just what I’ve heard.

This information has changed Jackson’s view of the little celebration from one in which it was fun and harmless to one in which it was sick and classless.

I can see that. I mean, I’m not all that interested in diving deep into the matter of whether or not someone peed in the pool, who it was, whether they are remorseful about it and all of the kind of handwringing that comes up about any weird, off-the-field matter of morals, ethics and taste, but I can see that.

For what it’s worth, I can muster some sharp thoughts about these matters for DUIs and PEDs and all manner of other things — I probably have a greater tolerance for it than most people — but I can’t go there for peeing in pools. I just can’t. At least not until we have a teary confession and an official statement from someone. Or maybe just some silly statements. If this spins silly, sure, I’ll be all over it, but I cant put on my serious/judgmental face for pee in a pool.

In other words: we’re gonna let this story mellow for a bit.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

tampa bay rays
Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
0 Comments

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.