Billy Hamilton had the Mets totally psyched out

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Reds manager Dusty Baker declined to start Billy Hamilton again Monday after his three-hit day Sunday, instead reserving him for pinch-running duties. When he did go to him in the eighth, it produced a memorable sequence.

Hamilton pinch-ran for Ryan Hanigan with two outs and none on in a tie game in the bottom of the eighth versus the Mets. Being that there were two outs, Hamilton wasted absolutely no time in trying to take second. He didn’t fool the Mets, either. Or not some of them, anyway. Catcher Travis d’Arnaud called for the pitchout on the first pitch with Frank Francisco on the mound. Francisco, apparently having his signals crossed, threw a fastball right down main street as Hamilton was taking off. D’Arnaud couldn’t snare it and Chris Heisey let the pitch go, so it ended up hitting umpire Tony Randazzo right in the chest.

That was fortunate, because Hamilton probably would have ended up on third had the ball missed the ump or deflected off to the side. As is, he was left stranded on second after Heisey struck out. Fortunately for the Mets, that marked the end of his night in the tie game.

MLBPA proposes 114-game season, playoff expansion to MLB

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ESPN’s Jeff Passan reports that the Major League Baseball Players Association has submitted a proposal to the league concerning the 2020 season. The proposal includes a 114-game season with an end date on October 31, playoff expansion for two years, the right for players to opt out of the season, and a potential deferral of 2020 salaries if the postseason were to be canceled.

Passan clarifies that among the players who choose to opt out, only those that are considered “high risk” would still receive their salaries. The others would simply receive service time. The union also proposed that the players receive a non-refundable $100 million sum advance during what would essentially be Spring Training 2.

If the regular season were to begin in early July, as has often been mentioned as the target, that would give the league four months to cram in 114 games. There would have to be occasional double-headers, or the players would have to be okay with few off-days. Nothing has been mentioned about division realignment or a geographically-oriented schedule, but those could potentially ease some of the burden.

Last week, the owners made their proposal to the union, suggesting a “sliding scale” salary structure. The union did not like that suggestion. Players were very vocal about it, including on social media as Max Scherzer — one of eight players on the union’s executive subcommittee — made a public statement. The owners will soon respond to the union’s proposal. They almost certainly won’t be happy with many of the details, but the two sides can perhaps find a starting point and bridge the gap. As the calendar turns to June, time is running out for the two sides to hammer out an agreement on what a 2020 season will look like.